Like CurlingZone on Facebook
 
 
   
Welcome to CurlingZone, Guest!   Register Now!    
Already a member?   Login:              Forgot Password?
ProCurlingWear - Support Our Troops
March | 2015 | CurlingZone
 Monthly Archives: March 2015
 

My name is Trevor Host and I will be describing my experiences at the Ford Men’s World Curling Championships as a part of Team USA.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

I would like to recognize how valuable our team sponsors are here and throughout the season.  We could not have gotten to this point without the equipment or monetary support that we have received from our sponsors.  Curlers are not in it for the money but for the love of the game.  However, with half of our schedule’s world curling tour events in Canada, the cost of travel quickly adds up.  Add on the registration fees and we are lucky to break even IF we can do well enough to earn prize money.  Therefore, we rely on sponsors to support our competitive schedule.  Our goal at the beginning of the year was to win the world championship. To get there, we needed to be the top order of merit team in the U.S. after the U.S. National Championship.  So we got to work early in September and chose 8 events, mainly based on our budget.  We earned enough points in those events to get us to be the top ranked U.S. team prior to Nationals (by a very narrow margin).  This was truly made possible by our sponsors and we can’t thank them enough for allowing us to do what we love.  For that reason I don’t feel bad about shamelessly plugging them here: Hardline Curling, kwik trip, Curlingzone, JC Sales, Georges’ Liquor, and ShotRock curling.

I would also like to mention our equipment sponsors especially.  Hardline agreed to sponsor us with their new icepad brooms this year and that has been fundamental to our successes thus far.  When we first got the brooms during the Stu Sells Toronto Tankard, we expected a marginal improvement in sweeping effectiveness.  Instead, we were blown away by the ability to hold the line and carry rocks, a little too much at first.  Shuster had to actually adjust his line calling to compensate for the new brooms.  Once we figured them out, the increased range of rock placement has been tremendously beneficial for our team.

Our other equipment sponsor was Runback apparel.  Runback worked with us and supplied us with jackets and jerseys for the WCT season.  They were very understanding with our requests and got a sweet looking design and all of our sponsor crests displayed on our uniforms.

Thanks again to all our sponsors.

 
 

My name is Trevor Host and I will be describing my experiences at the Ford Men’s World Curling Championships as a part of Team USA.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Today Team USA won our first game against Norway in an extra end and lost our second in 8 ends to the Swiss.  Curling can definitely be as frustrating as it is rewarding at times.  At this level, all athletes are required to stay mentally focused through the elated feeling of winning and devastating feeling of losing, sometimes all in one day.  Great teams are able to deal with this emotional toil and move forward to next step toward accomplishing their goal. This is done by returning to the fundamental of the game and focusing on the process, not the result.  A wise coach once said “Curling is a simple game played by complicated people.”  I believe we are doing our best to achieve that zen mindset moving forward in the week.

A helpful component of regenerating that mental focus is the support from family and friends here and from afar.  Certainly the Team USA fan section isn’t as loud as the Canadian’s but we still hear you loud and clear from around the arena.  Having that support means the world to the team and it helps ease the emotional tax this game causes.  The ability to relax with our close family and friends after the game allows the team to recharge for the next day of the same intense competition.  To all those at home connecting on social media, your support is felt as well and is so valuable for our team’s spirits.  We are looking forward to two games tomorrow and hopefully two wins on the board.

 
 

My name is Trevor Host and I will be describing my experiences at the Ford Men’s World Curling Championships as a part of Team USA.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Hosting a curling world championship in Canada breathes an air of excitement into the sport that is not present anywhere else in the world. Tonight, the Scotiabank Centre was thriving with crowds of fans bearing maple-leafed flags and “Go Canada Go” signs as we, Team USA, took on Team Canada during the opening day of the championship. Neither team afraid of leaving rocks in play led to big scores and great shots made by both teams. The game came down to an extra end draw to the four foot by Pat Simmons for which the crowd held its breath, then erupted when the shot was made.

Even though the outcome of the game wasn’t in our favor (favour), I was truly impressed by the enthusiasm of the fans. I would love to see this level of excitement towards curling in the United States and I believe it’s possible in the near future. Our director of communications, Terry Kolesar, tells me that there are curling clubs in nearly all 50 states and is ever growing. Recently, I have noticed almost everyone I meet has some knowledge of curling as opposed to a blank stare when I tell them what I do all winter, which is significantly different than the state U.S. Curling prior to the Olympics. Curling has been steadily on the rise in the U.S. and anyone who watched the game tonight or could experience the atmosphere in the arena will be instantly hooked on the sport we all love. It is going to be an exciting week here in Halifax as the best teams from all over the world compete to be #1. I am looking forward to great curling and an exciting atmosphere. I will be writing blog posts throughout the week to describe my experience.

Good Curling!

 
 

My name is Trevor Host and I will be describing my experiences at the Ford Men’s World Curling Championships as a part of Team USA.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Hosting a curling world championship in Canada breathes an air of excitement into the sport that is not present anywhere else in the world. Tonight, the Scotiabank Centre was thriving with crowds of fans bearing maple-leafed flags and “Go Canada Go” signs as we, Team USA, took on Team Canada during the opening day of the championship. Neither team afraid of leaving rocks in play led to big scores and great shots made by both teams. The game came down to an extra end draw to the four foot by Pat Simmons for which the crowd held its breath, then erupted when the shot was made.

Even though the outcome of the game wasn’t in our favor (favour), I was truly impressed by the enthusiasm of the fans. I would love to see this level of excitement towards curling in the United States and I believe it’s possible in the near future. Our director of communications, Terry Kolesar, tells me that there are curling clubs in nearly all 50 states and is ever growing. Recently, I have noticed almost everyone I meet has some knowledge of curling as opposed to a blank stare when I tell them what I do all winter, which is significantly different than the state U.S. Curling prior to the Olympics. Curling has been steadily on the rise in the U.S. and anyone who watched the game tonight or could experience the atmosphere in the arena will be instantly hooked on the sport we all love. It is going to be an exciting week here in Halifax as the best teams from all over the world compete to be #1. I am looking forward to great curling and an exciting atmosphere. I will be writing blog posts throughout the week to describe my experience.

Good Curling!

 
 

Sad State: Thoughts from a US HPP Athlete,

First off, I would like to congratulate John Shuster and team who had a great U.S. National’s week in Kalamazoo, MI. They were the most consistent team all week and are deserving of the title “National Champion.” I know they put a lot into this last season to get where they are now and I wish them nothing but the best in Halifax next month. Represent us well, boys. I know you will.

At this point, now that the season has ended, I feel an obligation to myself, my teammates and my family/friends to speak my mind so that we can all move forward knowing that every side has been given a chance to speak. My teammates and I have tried our best to stay out of the politics this season. We’ve done our best to focus only on the five people on the team, struggling not to let anything get in the way of our main goal, to get better both on and off of the ice. As everyone knows, a lot of work goes in to a curling season; on-ice practice, training both the mind and the body, and miles and miles of travel away from home, family and friends. It can wear you out mentally, especially when, like most Olympic sports, it doesn’t exactly pay the bills. We play this game because we love it and the people associated with it so it’s been extremely disheartening to see/hear all the negative comments, blogs, and posts that have been dispersed throughout our community regarding changes to our world team representative selection system and more specifically, my team, the HPP Red Team.

USA curling is in a tough spot. The rest of the world is progressing at a steady pace. Our neighbo(u)rs to the north are stronger than ever and we are battling a culture change in our own association that has seen our own members, past Olympic representatives and casual fans completely trash the organization and culture that US curling is trying to build. Everything changes, nothing stays the same forever. Every sport goes through growing pains like we are going through right now. I, however, believe we should count ourselves lucky. In the last couple of years the sport of curling has had great television ratings during the Olympics, ESPN has picked up streaming of Canadian championships, NBCSN did 6 weeks of curling coverage, and all of this without a consistent medal producing US curling program. We have all the athletic talent in the world but our athletes, our approach to competition at an international level has not produced. Even as US teams failed to consistently do well on the world stage, our local athletes and clubs did little to develop athletes and teams to be better than before. We need to be different, study strategy, be physically stronger. US world competition qualifying structures and systems were changed in an attempt to prevent our best teams from being shut out of world competitions due to “freak” losses at inopportune times, but little was done to force individuals to step up their commitment in an effort to rise to the same competitive levels that we now see not only in Canada but in Europe as well. We all assumed that the rope, handed to us by the USCA and USOC, was seemingly endless but nothing lasts forever and we’ve finally reached the end. The gravy train has broken down and we’re all responsible for letting the engine burn out. We are the reason that change was necessary, and change has come.

Before I go too much further I think I should give an athlete’s perspective of the new HPP system. The main purpose of the newly designed program is to develop U.S. curling into a world power. Nothing’s changed there, the goal remains the same as it has for as long as I can remember. The new regime has figured out a new way to go about it that just might work if you let it. The HPP teams are carefully chosen men and women who show more than just talent on the ice. An HPP athlete has to have a resume, years of experience, a solid work ethic, great team skills, has to be coachable, unselfish, be able to commit to an intensive schedule, and have talent to boot. Not every athlete fits this description, not every athlete wants to put in the work, and not every athlete has the time or money to commit to such an endeavor. The HPP is simply doing what every great organization has done and should do, they’re demanding that you work to get to the top. You can’t get in by just saying, “I want to be great,” anymore, you have to prove it with actions. Maybe the greatest benefit of the program is that it’s designed so that players can just play, and coaches can just coach. This is a huge change from the former system, where everyone wore multiple hats, and has always been something I’ve lobbied for. This system (in its infancy) has already pushed our community to be better, to work harder, to be more professional, and to be athletes! The door is just as open as it’s ever been, the only thing that’s changed is the route you have to take to get to it. I believe in it and I believe that over time the results will speak for themselves.

Everyone has their own opinions about the program and I’m sure we could go back and forth debating what the appropriate strategy is moving forward but that isn’t what this is about. This letter is about the state of affairs our community has found itself in. This is about the heart of our game becoming chipped and broken. This is why I’m blindly reaching out to all of you not knowing and half afraid of what will come back. Throughout this season, my teammates and I have endured a lot, certainly more than we bargained for. As part of the HPP we’ve been highly scrutinized and examined under a microscope. We’ve been attacked by both our friends and colleagues at our home clubs and in social media. We’ve been told my many that, “it isn’t personal,” that we’re just in the wrong place at the wrong time, basically. We’ve been labeled, “undeserving,” “spoiled,” and worse. We’ve endured so much hatred and vitriol towards a system, a team, that we’re a part of. Curling is a tight knit, tiny community and sadly most, if not all, of the negativity is coming from people who know me, my family, and who I call friends. It’s gone far past the debate stage and has turned into something insidious, something dark. It’s heartbreaking, it’s unwarranted and most of all it is absolutely personal. The biggest problem though, is that this kind of petty and back biting behavior affects all of us. The posts on Facebook, on the forums here on curlingzone.com and all of the negative comments are public, available for the whole world to see/hear. The attitude displayed this year has damaged our credibility and if we’re not careful can do irreversible harm to a game we all love so much.

Most of the negativity this year has been in defense of “The Spirit of The Game.” I get it, I love what this sport is about at its core just as much as anyone but the negativity and the ease at which we’ve abandoned our own is, to me, in direct conflict of that. Think about what you write and think about what you say. Think about who will read it, about how they’ll react and about if you care. Think about the future of our game, not the past. Be patient, be kind, have faith and work hard.

Good Curling.
Coin Hufman & Chris Plys

 
 

In tonight’s Tim Hortons Brier game dubbed as the Battle of Alberta between Team Canada’s Alberta based Team Morris now skipped by Pat Simmons was facing Alberta champions Team Kevin Koe in an important match in the standings. In the 9th end with the game tied at 3, Carter Rycroft was attempting a double peel and his rock red-lighted, meaning he had a hogline violation and his rock would be removed. A huge turning point in the end and surprising everyone as Carter exclaimed that he’s never had a violation in the past.

Good for the teams, the game was one of the two feature games and TSN had the video coverage to show the replay. Check it out for yourself:

As was seen at the Juniors in the Women’s final, and at the Scotties it appears the sensor handles have failed again to properly detect a violation, and not show up as a fail as Rycroft was giving the opportunity to throw again by Team Koe, as third Marc Kennedy suggested it was the right thing to do. When Rycroft threw again, the rock flashed clean and looked good, so we do have to question whether the system or the athlete actually had a violation.

It looked close on the video, but this should clean up all questions as there was clearly air between the handle and Rycroft’s hand just before the hogline:
CarterRycroft

Now we really need to wonder what is going on with these sensors as there’s now been several confirmed false-positive in important games. Let’s hope they’re working on a solution for next season, as we’d hate to see another team have to choose between Sportsmanship and Winning. Team Kevin Koe may have lost the game tonight, but they came out on top in the minds of many fans this evening.

 
 

The Canadian Curling Association. An iconic yet stuffy name that made you think back to day of writing tests and the execution of the curling rules. For many, the Association was still stuck in the old ways of thinking and only a full rebrand would help to escape some of these stereotypes of the game.

Enter Curing Canada, a fully bilingual brand that encompasses all things curling in this country. From merchandising, to events and a mindset, the new identity has been neutral to well-received among fans, which is quite the feat considering how adverse to change many people are.

On top of the look, the approach to how Curling Canada runs events has started to evolve now as well. Starting this season, Curling Canada has hired Chris Dornan into a new role, Manager of Game Day Promotion, and also termed as Underground Marketing. The sport desperately needs a new direction and the work being put in should help to build on this into the future.

We had a chance to connect with Chris yesterday to talk some about his role and the projects he’s working on:

What we’re seeing is a new energy on the curling ice and around the building, but admittedly it will take some time to see a reversal of the decline. With attendance numbers hovering around 50% of what was done in 2009 at the Saddledome in Calgary, the challenge will be to rebrand the game in the minds of the new fans, the people who watch at home and aren’t really curlers.

Acts like the Absolute Dance Crew who performed on the ice on Saturday and Sunday nights are a great start to add more intensity to the event:

We need to be cool again. The new brand is a step in the right direction.

 
 

Watch the back foot on the delivery:
http://www.mobypicture.com/user/ottguy/view/17888136The Curling News, both teams involved has been advised that future issues are to be reported immediately to on-ice officials.

UPDATE: Tuesday 12:02AM MT – Is it being suggested that hitting another player to remind them of a rules violation is acceptable?
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=964945880184112

Monday 10:30PM MT – This is not an accident. In tonight’s Tim Hortons Brier game between Northern Ontario’s Brad Jacobs and Mark Kean from Ontario, you can clearly see Team Kean third Mathew Camm receive a smack on his trailing foot at the end of his delivery in the third end.

While this seems like it “could” be an accident, word is that David Mathers also received a smack from Team Jacobs as well.

While it doesn’t immediately affect that specific shot, reviewing the TSN video of the game, Matthew Camm can be seen jumping out of his delivery the next shot, an end that Ontario went on to give up three points.

Team Kean was accused of leaving knee prints on the ice in last night’s game against Alberta, and it seems this is how Team Jacobs sends the message.

Comments on Twitter and among fans suggest it’s not always a two-way street as this photo from earlier this week by Curling Canada’s Michael Burns suggests:

My question to this is whether it would be acceptable for Camm to whack Fry in response for having his knee and fingers on the ice?

Would they do this to John Morris, or Jean-Michel Menard or any other team on the ice? Or was this a little gamesmanship against the rookie team at the event?

Talking to Glenn Howard after the game, he was upset after seeing a replay of the incident. “If these guys are leaving knee or handprints on the ice, then you have to say something.”

“To see these guys hit another player, it’s disappointing and not part of the game.”

After the game, Team Ontario members were upset about the situation, and word of an official protest had been made.

 
 
 
Eastern Time (ET)
Full Scoreboard  |  Play Fantasy Pick'em!  

MOST RECENT CZ FORUM POSTS

U.S.A. Curling
2017 Arena Nationals
Rock Talk
It's time to crack down on International teams ( 1 2 3 )
World Curling Tour
2017 European Masters
Rock Talk
Mixed Doubles
U.S.A. Curling
USA Curling Trials (lodging, tickets, rental cars)
U.S.A. Curling
World Mixed Doubles
Rock Talk
Costly Loss at Worlds
Gear Zone/Classifieds
Goldline Quantum X Men's Curling Shoes - Size 9 for Sale
Rock Talk
Which skill is most important ( 1 2 )
U.S.A. Curling
2017-18 High Performance Program
Manitoba Curling
Manitoba shuffle 2017/2018 ( 1 2 )
Rock Talk
Curling in Canada 1937 lecture by Gordon Hudson
Fantasy Curling
Fantasy Pick'em
Playdowns
Women's ROTR Qualifiying for Ottawa ( 1 2 3 )
Playdowns
Mixed Doubles Playdowns ( 1 2 3 )
Post New Message  |  View All Forums

Follow CurlingZone on these networks:

Join CZ on Facebook! Follow CZ on Twitter!

Warning: include(/var/www/vhosts/curlingzone.com/httpdocs/talk/wp-content/themes/twentytwelve/table.php): failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /var/www/vhosts/curlingzone.com/httpdocs/talk/wp-content/themes/twentytwelve/footer.php on line 55 Warning: include(): Failed opening '/var/www/vhosts/curlingzone.com/httpdocs/talk/wp-content/themes/twentytwelve/table.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:') in /var/www/vhosts/curlingzone.com/httpdocs/talk/wp-content/themes/twentytwelve/footer.php on line 55 Proudly powered by WordPress
CurlingZone.com: Questions, comments, beefs? Click here to email us.
© 2001-2014 CurlingZone. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Service | Privacy Policy